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Footnotes

Footnotes for the Professional Standards.

 Footnotes

  1. “Nurse” refers to registered nurses, nurse practitioners and licensed graduate nurses. 
  2. Examples of relevant legislation include the Health Professions Act and the regulations under it, and other legislation governing nursing practice, such as the Health Care (Consent) and Care Facility (Admission) Act. Nurses are also required to comply with other federal and provincial legislation that may not be within CRNBC’s regulatory mandate, but which may be enforceable by other regulatory bodies, tribunals or the courts. For an overview of legislation relevant to nursing practice, refer to the CRNBC document, Legislation Relevant to Nurses’ Practice.
  3. Requires investment of own time, effort and other resources. 
  4. Visit the College’s Quality Assurance Program​ for details.
  5. Taking action includes advocacy. Nurses advocate in ways that are consistent with their role and responsibilities. For example, nurses in clinical practice are expected to advocate for their client if the client’s perspective is not being considered by another professional involved in their care, but not expected to lobby for legislative change.
  6. Whenever possible, nurses involve clients in assessment, decision-making about client status, care planning, implementation and evaluation.
  7. The timeliness of documentation will vary. When client acuity, complexity and variability is high, more frequent documentation is required than when clients are less acute, less complex and/or less variable.
  8. Involves applying knowledge and skills related to such things as relationship-building, assertiveness, problem-solving and conflict resolution.
  9. The Indicators in the education, administration and research areas describe criteria for meeting the standard in an educator, administrator or research role. If clients are involved during the course of performing these roles, the Indicators in the clinical practice area would also apply.
  10. Team members may be from more than one practice setting.
  11. Nurses are frequently involved in assignment. Delegation and authorization under supervision, on the other hand, are legal terms for authorizing another person to carry out an aspect of practice. Both entail distinct responsibilities and accountabilities for all parties involved. For advice regarding delegation and regulatory supervision, contact a CRNBC nursing practice consultant.
  12. The Indicators in the education, administration and research areas describe criteria for meeting the standard in an educator, administrator or research role. If clients are involved during the course of performing these roles, the Indicators in the clinical practice area would also apply.
  13. This standard, along with several Practice Standards (e.g., Duty to Provide Care, Boundaries in the Nurse-Client Relationship, Privacy and Confidentiality), articulate requirements for ethical behaviour. The Canadian Nurses Association’s Code of Ethics for Registered Nurses contains additional information about professional ethics (e.g., ethical values, ethical decision-making).
  14. This includes interactions with clients, colleagues, students and others. It includes appropriate recognition of power differentials.
  15. The term “resources” is used broadly and includes the nurse’s time and skills as well as equipment and supplies.
  16. The Indicators in the education, administration and research areas describe criteria for meeting the standard in an educator, administrator or research role. If clients are involved during the course of performing these roles, the Indicators in the clinical practice area would also apply.
  17. Includes bullying, harassment and inappropriate use of power.​
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